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What We're Reading: Bomb Threats, School Food, and Rich Parents

posted Feb 5, 2016, 11:31 AM by Robin Dutton-Cookston   [ updated Feb 5, 2016, 11:53 AM ]
We are passionate about news and events that impact children and education, and we frequently share and discuss articles around the PPS-SF office. Here is what we are reading this week. 

From CNBC
When a school is threatened, the protocol is to treat the threat, then determine its credibility. Despite the location or extenuating circumstances surrounding a threat, there is no easy answer for school administrators who must quickly determine how to respond under pressure. read more
From BeyondChron
In 2013, San Francisco Unified School District unveiled its plan to update school cafeterias and use technology to encourage more students to choose school meals. Hopes were high that after many years of lackluster performance, the number of kids eating school lunch would begin to climb. read more 

From The Seventy Four
In the basement of New Design High School on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, in a drab concrete room with poor lighting and low ceilings, seven teenage girls are sitting on yoga mats. Absent are the Lululemon outfits, the scented candles and ambiguously soothing music that are synonymous with yoga classes these days. read more

From Education Week
Much of what we know about school choice in the United States comes from observing parents who choose one sector over another to provide for their children's education. Researchers have considered differences between parents who opt for charter schools over traditional public schools, for example, or differences between parents in Catholic over secular private or otherwise public schools. read more 

From The Atlantic
I’m a card-carrying member of three parent school associations. I write the weekly newsletter for the special-education parents’ group and help organize social events for disabled kids. But my involvement is minimal compared to the extraordinary efforts by others who raise money for schools in our town. read more